Eau de Camille by Annick Goutal (1983)

‘When I go into the glass houses and I see the strange plants of exotic lands, it seems to me that I enter into a dream.’ (Henri Rousseau)

 

 

 

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Annick Goutal’s simple but beautiful Eau de Camille is like one of Rousseau’s paintings. A primeval dawn of innocence where seringa flowers bloom and dew evaporates on giant leaves in the ten o’clock sun. A garden where quick young children hide in secret, dark-green places.

 

 

 

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16 Comments

Filed under Flowers, Grass, Green, Ivy, Perfume Reviews, Seringa

16 responses to “Eau de Camille by Annick Goutal (1983)

  1. brie

    I wish you would have written more about this hidden gem!
    I discovered Annick Goutal during my first trip to Paris in the early 90s. The hotel provided us with eau d’Hadrien toilettries and I dragged my girlfriend all over Paris until we found the flagship store so that I could purchase a bottle. Ironically I left the store with a bottle of eau de Ciel!
    Several months later I discovered that Saks Fifth Avenue in NYC carried the entire line and offered seasonal BOGOs. Imagine getting TWO 100ml bottles for under 100 dollars? Needless to say I went crazy and within a very short amount of time became the proud owner of Folavril, eau d’Hadrien, eau de Sud, Heure Exquise, eau de Charlotte, eau de Camille and Petite Cherie. However, the one only one that became a repurchase time and time again was eau de Camille. It was so not my style with all of its greenery and ivy but I was captivated by that scent and garnered many compliments when wearing it.
    As the company changed hands and new scents were invented the original AGs got put to the side and without the BOGOs became quite expensive. However, every once in a while you could find a bottle on an online discount site.

    • ginzaintherain

      I know, it is lovely. The time I put this review up though I quite fancied something succinct and to tell the story with pictures instead. We all have our quieter sides..

  2. serafinarose

    Eau de Camille has something of the periwigged footman about it – a slim, neat fella clad in scarlet livery -a thesp standing on a C19th stage. I see painted flats and an interior decked in lobster-pink and gold. Perhaps he is a bystander in a melodramatic rendition of Therese Racquin? A bit-part, calmly delivering sherry to Mme Camille as she frets over the fate of her son and his surly bride. Either way, he’s sweet and neat, perhaps slightly superfluous, but knows how to hold a tray, and maintain a fine profile for an audience to gaze upon. But once the show is over, and the costume is off – oh, the gardens! And the perfume is then, in its fullness, as you describe, dear Ginza. I adore your sweet and quiet review, and adore Rousseau. Many thanks for this beauty.

    • ginzaintherain

      And I love yours even now. You have taken the scent out of the childhood garden and into entirely other climes – love it!

      Incidentally, the only I person I know who does wear this scent is a man, sprayed openly just beneath his shirt collar. It is delicate, dandyish and great on him so I know exactly what you are talking about!

  3. A beautiful scent, and fab review.

  4. Lilybelle

    I love Eau de Camille. Or did. I haven’t smelled it in ages. I wonder whether it’s still being made? I felt exactly as you did: it reminded me of a secret dark green place where I’d hide as a child. What a beautiful feeling.

  5. Eau de Camille has always reminded me of wet hedges, and the Rousseau imagery is perfect!

  6. David

    Your blog is the perfect thing to read on the first day of Carnival. I mean first night….

  7. David

    Oh, no. I am home. It’s pouring down rain. My Brazilian partner went out anyway, to the street carnival near our apartment. I would rather read your archives. I sprayed Comme des Garçons Black. I love that many people say it is a winter perfume. I love that kind of scent in the hot Brazilian summer. One of the popular night clubs near here will have a ’90s disco night. Many Brazilians detest Carnival. Don’t you just love doing the opposite of what is expected?

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