TEA AND EUCALYPTUS : : : KIMONO VERT by ART DE PARFUM (2022)

Eucalyptus is a rare note in perfumery, especially as a bracing and prominent top note. Intensely therapeutic; mind clearing, a pulmonary healer, and all round regenerating, I think of this essential oil as more of a medicine than a perfume – although I do like its beautiful green and refreshing scent (particularly of the eucalyptus globulus variety) – rather more than the sweet pungent, Myrtacae family-related oils of niaouli, cajeput and ravensara.

‘Bouchon’ Eucalyptus perfume bottle by René Lalique.

Art De Parfum’s curious, and rather original new proposition for spring and summer, is a green tea-infused eucalpytus, a light and aromatic fragrance featuring gently metallic and aquatic notes vaguely reminiscent of 90’s neo-Japonisme – the magnolia and water lotus of L’Eau Par Kenzo and L’Eau Issey Miyake – but less forceful : more restrained. Geranium, mint, plum and a cedar chypric light base of patchouli round off a peculiar but convincing combination of energies, theoretically clashing, but in fact androgynously serene.

11 Comments

Filed under Flowers

11 responses to “TEA AND EUCALYPTUS : : : KIMONO VERT by ART DE PARFUM (2022)

  1. I do not know if this would be a scent for me, cosidering my history with green tea scents, but the bottle is lovely. I enjoy the scent of eucalyptus, but not in fragrance I would think. Then again, it might be interesting.
    Love all the photos!

  2. Robin

    That Lalique bottle!!!!!

    The video is gorgeous. I’d like to try it, although eucalyptus is not a note I generally enjoy. (Ric gave me a ginormous bottle of eucalyptus foam bath and it’s had minimal attention, I’m afraid.) Still loved reading about it. (I do love l’Eau par Kenzo.) Thank you, dear N.

    • Eucalyptus is a weird one, and if you don’t like it as a note, you would HATE this – a real mash up of oddness. But if someone floated by you on the street, and not even necessarily in a green kimono, I reckon you would do a head turn and be momentarily excited. There is something slightly fascinating in all the unusual juxtapositions.

  3. There was a windbreak of eucalyptus trees at the far end of my property in Sonoma, loved their brisk scent mingling with the cool ocean breezes that brought fog on summer evenings.
    I think eucalyptus is underused in perfumery as it suffers a cultural stereotype of being a cough & cold remedy in the West. (Patchouli endures the same fate in Indian culture.)
    This perfume sounds interesting, I shall have to try it.

    • Yes, like me you enjoy refreshing scents in summer and I can imagine you getting a kick out of the contemporary briskness of this one overall, though I don’t know how you feel about that 90’s ozone/aqua vibe in the back drop.

      I LOVE the smell of eucalyptus trees in the breeze as well, though I have never experienced a whole lot of them next to the sea as you describe here (sounds heavenly!)

      I agree that eucalyptus has possibly been underused in a way in perfumery, and it could be used more subtly than it is in Kimono Vert (it is easier to imagine it fused into a typical men’s aromatic), but at the same time I like the audacity in fulling embracing such an outsider and meshing it with green tea.

  4. Testamento Olfattivo

    What you think about Contradiction by Calkin Klein and about one of my favorite: Jangala by Pierre Guillaume?

    • I remember quite liking Contradiction back in the day – it kind of disappeared quickly though, didn’t it ?

      I don’t know Jangala. What is it like ?

      • I bought Contradiction and am waiting for it to arrive to test it.
        It was a purchase motivated by your article on eucalyptus smell.
        Instead I know Jangala well which revolves around a mentholated coconut from eucalyptus.
        It is a masterful work by Pierre Guillaume, the refreshing humidity of a jungle with creamy touches that are never suffocating.
        It would be very nice if you could try it.
        Thanks for the reply and sorry for my bad English

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s