OCCIDENTALISM: : FRANGIPANE by SANTA MARIA NOVELLA (1828)

The Black Narcissus

Image

Image

Image

One of the weirdest, but most intriguing, florals I have ever smelled, Santa Maria Novella’s enviable status as apothecary as much as perfumery certainly comes into focus in their most unusual offering.

With a dense, medicinal, almost creepy take on a tropical flower – herbal, smoky, heady and unlike anything else – it is hard to imagine what the monks were quite thinking of as they checked the macerations in their cellars; nodded ‘si’, and sagely began to pour the tarry liquid into bottles.

With its almost perverse combination of sanctity and putridity, I think that Frangipane is probably one of my favourites from SMN (along with the thyme-laden Sandalo, Tuberosa, Pot Pourri, Garofano, and their emotive, inimitably rarified patchouli), although I have yet to actually take the plunge and buy some. Surprisingly, I have also heard that Frangipane is popular with certain, in-the-know swathes of Tokyo dandies, who…

View original post 107 more words

2 Comments

Filed under Flowers

2 responses to “OCCIDENTALISM: : FRANGIPANE by SANTA MARIA NOVELLA (1828)

  1. Difficult to associate frangipani flowers with a ‘medicinal, herbal, smoky’ scent! I have never smelled one before but they remind me of mangoes and cream and breezy island joy.

    • Naturally, and so do I. And my own frangipani tree, even though it is almost November, is still just about squeezing one last Hawaiian flower on my balcony.

      This is entirely different though. Actually quite fascinating.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s