THE SPRING FLOWERS THAT ENDURE : Nymphéa, Flower, J’Adore, Antonia’s Flowers, Floret, Romance, Pleasures, Bouquet De La Reine

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It is that time.

NYMPHEA / IL PROFUMO (2004)

I am not sure how such a heavenly creature actually works on a real life girl, but this dreamy, artful, fresh-green bouquet (bamboo, fig, white waterlily, lotus flowers, water jasmine, and white rose) is, in my view, almost heartbreakingly lovely. Il Profumo describes it as having a ‘lacustrine tranquillity’, and it does have such a transparent, lake-like, lily-pad beauty that I am compelled to agree.

ANTONIA’S FLOWERS/ ANTONIA’S FLOWERS (1985)

Antonia was a florist in The Hamptons, and knowing her flowers, and adoring freesias, and being dissatisfied with the floral scents available on the market, set out to create her own. In the process she produced three American classics: Antonia’s Flowers, Floret, and Tiempe Passate, all of which have apparently been among the best selling fragrances since their launches at Bergdorf’s and Barney’s New York.

Despite my own personal love of fleurs à la Parisienne, there is no reason why the classic French model (flowers, woods, musks and animalics) should necessarily predominate in a person’s floral wardrobe; not everyone wants that suggestive, ‘come-thither’ quality in a perfume – sometimes you want a scent that goes on fresh and clean and stays that way. And what distinguishes the Antonia’s Flowers perfumes from the mass-market chemical-sheen ‘flowers’ like Romance and Happyis a natural, well crafted, ‘made-with-love’ quality that, in the case of this, her eponymous fragrance, shines all the way through the brilliant fusion of light-shimmering, china-dry rosewood and crisp, springtime flowers (mainly freesia, magnolia and lily). It is a highly unusual fragrance – the intense but beautifully natural bois-de-rose note is too much for some – but one I would recommend to anybody who loves flowers and just flowers.

FLORET/ ANTONIA’S FLOWERS (1995)

Or alternately, try Floret: a tightly controlled, crystal-clear, sweet-pea floral, with  rose, tuberose and marigold, and a delicious, transparent apricot top note. Pure, feminine, it is springtime in a bottle: the olfactory equivalent of pressed, clean clothes in an airy, open room.

FLOWER BY KENZO/ KENZO (2000)

‘A flower with no fragrance.’

Kenzo, who I have always liked (for their Kenzo Homme, L’Eléphant, Le Tigre, Summer, Kashâya and their sensuous, eponymous original scent) suddenly became a major contender in the perfume world when, thirteen years ago, in a marketing act of brilliance, they released a rather stunningly designed bottle, which appeared to contain poppies at various stages of growth, and cleverly filled airports and department stores with them. The effect was startling, the concept (‘creating the scent of the poppy’) an instant hit with consumers, and thus cities were suddenly filled with scent of young office girls going to work in Flower.

It is a very pleasant scent, like anything by the company; airy and green, with soothing, gentle notes of Bulgarian rose, hawthorn, cassie and parma violets over a sheer, powdery almond base: gentle, carefree, light, and safe – like running through a neighbouring field in freshly tumble-dried, clean smelling clothes. Which is another way of saying that it is fragrant, and nice, but rather dull. I quite like it, but don’t get my friend Helen started on how much, and why, she despises this to the extent that she does.

J’ADORE/ CHRISTIAN DIOR (1999)

Knowing what the women wanted – something fresh, light, sophisticated but somehow ‘vulnerable’ – Calice Becker, one of the world’s undisputed masters of florals, created a scent for Dior in 1999 that  went down a storm – J’Adore is now one of the world’s best selling scents, and I can certainly understand why. Despite the usual fresh floral metallica, this perfume does have that ‘classic’ stamp on it; the greenness of the fresh ivy top notes; the gleaming flowers (orchids, champaca, white roses, violets – apparently it was designed as an ‘emotional floral’); the fruitiness (Damascus plum and blackberry musk), the gentle, skin-tone, base notes. This scent is ‘pure woman’, and something you can’t really go wrong with. For evenings out. For romantic dinners. For engagement parties and anniversaries: the magazine adverts featuring Charlize Theron say it all – in gold; glamorous, pretty, charming and ‘dazzling’.

Despite my objective appreciation of its charms, however, I myself don’t  like J’Adore at all, and, as the murdered woman in Goldfinger was to find, all that gold can be suffocating.  The perfection; the flawlessness, is all too much for me I’m afraid, and it catches in my throat; hysterical – a sharp, processed, gilded lacquer.

ROMANCE/ RALPH LAUREN (1998)

True-blue thoroughbred, how could Ralphie go wrong with an advertising campaign that played up to every Tiffany-dreaming, happy-ending, Caucasian fantasy? And the smell! So clear, so sheer, so ‘romantically’ floral and clean: so ‘right-for-every-occasion’.

Inevitable then, that Romance should be such a big hit. I can’t personally say that I like it (shrill; synthetic; far too conservative for this writer), but it might be what you are looking for if you want an inoffensive, indistinct scent for that wedding or baby shower.

PLEASURES/ ESTEE LAUDER (1995)

Pleasures is, I think, aimed at the same target audience as Romance; thirty-something mothers of a stable income and societal position who shun any hint of prurience (or even any acknowledgement they have a body) in their scent (what would the other mothers think?!?). For the successful original advertising campaign, that foxy British minx of the upper-middle classes, Liz Hurley, donned a lilac cashmere sweater, and, airbrushedly, tumbled about with a Lenor-washed puppy in a field, a thousand miles from the cleavage Versace It-dress that made her famous. The message was clear: like Romance, this woman was a Good Girl, and her family values were most Virginally Intact.

The difference between Romance and Pleasures, though, is that Pleasure has character, and lots of it – only characterful creations are this recognizable. So powerfully, translucently floral it almost hurts, this complex bouquet of rain-drenched flowers (lily, lilac,  violet leaves, peonies, baie-rose…) can be hypnotically feminine, mysterious even, on the right person if used in small doses (I have known women who have smelled quite gorgeous in it) but, ultimately, it is so resolutely ‘pure’, so WASP, I have to say that it rather scares me.

BOUQUET DE LA REINE / FLORIS (2002)

Middle England: a secret, illicit tryst between two married people, in love,  speaking in quiet voices under their drinks in the hotel bar.

He is wearing Eucris (Geo F Trumper): she is wearing this: a pretty, insistent bouquet, green and fresh (bergamot, blackcurrant buds, violet leaf,  rose, ylang and jasmine) that is respectable, pliant, and womanly. He leans in closer, and, furtively watching and smelling from a distance, we don’t doubt for a moment the passion that will later ensue.

 

 

 

 

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11 Comments

Filed under Floral Bouquet, Flowers

11 responses to “THE SPRING FLOWERS THAT ENDURE : Nymphéa, Flower, J’Adore, Antonia’s Flowers, Floret, Romance, Pleasures, Bouquet De La Reine

  1. brie

    You are really on a roll……springtime here we come!
    I have worn all but two you have written about….my favorites being Antonia’s Flowers (had a huge perfume concentrate bottle in 1986-the best freesia EVER!) and Pleasures. Did not care for Romance and never understood the hype. J’Adore was a bit too strong and cloying on my skin. Floret I would love to try for the apricot top note. And your visual on Bouquet de la Reine makes this one the most appealing.
    Here’s to the beginnings of brighter days in which we can enjoy our florals!

  2. I adore this post and all the wonderful photographs too. I wish this were my my shopping list. I love the sound of Antonia’s Flowers and think that florists are perfectly placed to make perfume, probably knowing the scent of each flower at each stage than many others.

    I went through a Pleasures stage and whilst I like it very much, the love has gone and it smells a little silvery and metallic to me now, but I agree with you about the virginal touch. It’s gorgeous but not sexy.

    As for Nymphea, never tried it or seen it, but I desperately want to. The name was enough, and the description clinched it for me. Thanks for widening my horizons!

    Best wishes
    Samantha at IScentYouADay

    • In truth I can’t entirely picture Nymphea in my smell brain any more, which goes to show you how delicate it must be. I know I really liked it when I tried it, although I couldn’t possibly carry off something like that myself. I do think that Il Profumo make nice perfumes though; strong, yet with a definite delicacy,.

      • Now that’s a brand I have never tried, so I shall do so on your recommendation. I was looking at Les Senteurs online the other day and noticed them there so I shall pop back and have another look.

        Thank you and best wishes
        Samantha

  3. I agree with Brie (and you) about Romance and j’Adore–I didn’t like either one and could not understand their popularity. Pleasures was okay but ended up boring me. I used to love Antonia’s Flowers and Tiempe Passante but wasn’t a fan of Floret. I have il Profumo’s Nymphea and still wear it (and usually get compliments when I wear it). I have tried many Floris fragrances but never Bouquet de la Reine. Our weather is not yet Spring-like and I am still wearing my Winter fragrances. But after reading your post, I am going to wear Nymphea today!

  4. Martha

    I am curious about Helen’s dislike of Flower. I really loathe the Marc Jacobs line – Daisy, etc. For myself, the smell of popularity is what gets to me. It is the ubiquitous pleasantness of it all. I know that there are times when one’s perfume should not stand out in a crowd, but smelling the same type of fragrance on every second person is just so boring. As far as the perfumes by Estée Lauder go, well, that company knows its market.

  5. Actually, the Nymphea I have and wear is not by il Profumo—it is by Profumum from Roma, another Italian perfumer.
    .

  6. Tania

    I must admit, I’m not a fan of Kenzo Flower either. I love the bottle, but the scent makes me think of Mycota anti-fungal foot powder.

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