THREE HAIRY SCENTS BY ROCHAS, PARIS : : : : MOUSTACHE (1948) + MONSIEUR ROCHAS (1969) + + MACASSAR (1980)

BECAUSE THE EDICT ON FACIAL HAIR AT MY COMPANY BUGS ME EVEN MORE THAN THE ONE ON PERFUME. I HAD TO SHAVE TODAY AFTER THE ‘GOLDEN WEEK’ HOLIDAY AND I FEEL LIKE AN INFURIATED AND EMASCULATED DELILAH (WELL, SAMSON, ACTUALLY, BUT YOU GET MY DRIFT…..)

The Black Narcissus

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I woke up yesterday feeling macho. And so I went into Kamakura for my twice monthly Japanese lesson wearing Paco Rabanne Pour Homme, a nice, classic, soapy, barber-shop fougère that I use on such occasions, walking along the road feeling broad-shouldered, manly, and hunked (in the nicest possible way).

As luck should have it, after the lesson, in the antique shop I often frequent, down one of the back streets, a place that always stocks a selection of unwanted vintage perfumes, they had just had a new influx of curiosities for me to peruse at my unhurried leisure. While mainly overpriced (yet ultimately, pretty reasonable considering), the proprietors usually give me a discount anyway, and, my eyes immediately startled, I pounced, straight away, upon a full bottle of unused Creed Royal English Leather: a discontinued, unusual beauty that I couldn’t quite resist at the bargain price of 2500 yen with…

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One response to “THREE HAIRY SCENTS BY ROCHAS, PARIS : : : : MOUSTACHE (1948) + MONSIEUR ROCHAS (1969) + + MACASSAR (1980)

  1. jennyredhen

    Makassar is a very exotic city in Indonesia, Makassar sometimes spelled Macassar, Mangkasara’ – is the provincial capital of South Sulawesi, Indonesia. It is the largest city on Sulawesi Island in terms of population, and the fifth largest city in Indonesia after Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung, and Medan. From 1971 to 1999, the city was named Ujung Pandang, after a precolonial fort in the city, and the two names are often used interchangeably. The city is located on the southwest coast of the island of Sulawesi, facing the Makassar Strait. Beginning in the sixteenth century, Makassar was the dominant trading center of eastern Indonesia, and soon became one of the largest cities in island Southeast Asia. The Makassar kings maintained a policy of free trade, insisting on the right of any visitor to do business in the city, and rejecting the attempts of the Dutch to establish a monopoly.Beginning in the sixteenth century, Makassar was the dominant trading center of eastern Indonesia, and soon became one of the largest cities in island Southeast Asia. The Makassar kings maintained a policy of free trade, insisting on the right of any visitor to do business in the city, and rejecting the attempts of the Dutch to establish a monopoly.

    The trade in spices figured prominently in the history of Sulawesi, which involved frequent struggles between rival native and foreign powers for control of the lucrative trade during the pre-colonial and colonial period, when spices from the region were in high demand in the West. Much of South Sulawesi’s early history was written in old texts that can be traced back to the 13th and 14th centuries.

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